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Quebec families can win a $3,000 getaway – if they turn off their screens for 24 hours. Here's how

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Log off, turn off and look up.

The Quebec Association of Optometrists is organizing the "PAUSE" challenge that invites Quebecers to disconnect for 24 hours on Sunday.

"Take advantage of this Sunday to leave the screens aside," reads the events page. "It's simple: families agree not to use screens (cell phones, tablets, TVs, computers, game consoles, etc.) for leisure purposes for 24 hours."

Families that register are eligible to win a $3,000 getaway by agreeing to not text, Facetime, screen a series or update a fantasy baseball team.

Utilitarian use of a cell phone (such as GPS, making a call or payment) is fine, as is listening to music using a smartphone.

"See the 24-hour PAUSE as a family as an invitation to put screens aside in order to enjoy the benefits of disconnection, such as finding free time together to do offline activities or to slow down and take a breather," the event page reads. "24 hours allows you to take a step back to see the place of technology in your family's daily life, then to reconnect more consciously rather than reflexively, by focusing on online use that does good."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by PAUSE (@pausetonecran)

PAUSE organizers give these tips to prepare for Sunday:

  • Plan your screen-free time with your family by identifying activities and allowing each family member to suggest them.
  • Plan zero tech activities such as playing outside, listening to music, doing relaxing exercises, drawing or cooking.
  • Warn those around you that you are participating and not be reachable by text.
  • Store or configure devices so they're not easy to pick up and connect with automatically. Turn off visual and sound notifications, hide apps, and/or put your phones on airplane mode. 
  • Sign up here.

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