Skip to main content

West Island naturopath fined $120,000 for recidivist 'illegal' practice

Share

A Pointe-Claire naturopath has been ordered by the courts to pay $120,000 in fines for the illegal practice of medicine and for leading people to believe that he was authorized to perform acts reserved for members of the Quebec College of Physicians.

In her decision rendered Friday, Quebec Court Judge Mylène Grégoire took into consideration the fact that the College of Physicians has been trying to put an end to Ken Montizambert's "illegal" practice for several years before various bodies, as reported by Noovo Info.

Back in 2014, the courts granted an injunction to severely limit the osteopath and naturopath's work. The College of Physicians claimed Montizambert would diagnose illnesses and write prescriptions, something only medical doctors are licensed to do.

At the time, an investigator visited Montizambert's clinic, Tri-Med clinic on St-Jean Boulevard in Pointe-Claire. They reported the osteopath used metal probes connected to a laptop to try to diagnose illnesses such as liver disease and prostate cancer, and would prescribe homeopathic solutions as remedies.

On two occasions in 2019, investigators again visited his office, were diagnosed with illnesses and prescribed medications. Montizambert was found to have performed acts reserved only for members of the college. Grégoire found him guilty on seven counts in March 2023.

In handing down the fine on Friday, Grégoire highlighted the fact that, despite previous legal charges, including a repeat offence and a permanent injunction against him, the naturopath continued his practice.

Of note, he continued to see patients, diagnose them and sell them medicines, as demonstrated in a report by journalist Véronique Dubé for Noovo Info last April, which was used as evidence in the case.

Grégoire stated that Montizambert has a high degree of responsibility and his moral culpability is "complete, even aggravated" by the opportunistic and lucrative aspect of his offences.

"The defendant cannot hide behind the existence of other rules and legislation elsewhere in the country in an attempt to mitigate his liability. No one is supposed to be ignorant of the law, and the Tribunal applies those in force in its jurisdiction," the judge determined.

The court ruled that this sentence must send a clear message to the naturopath, calling him a "recidivist" and "recalcitrant."

"Without being overly severe, these sanctions are proportionate to the degree of responsibility and the profile of the defendant," reads Friday's ruling.

- With files from Noovo Info

CTVNews.ca Top Stories

Trump says his criminal indictments boosted his appeal to Black voters

Former U.S. president Donald Trump claimed Friday that his four criminal indictments have boosted his support among Black Americans because they see him as a victim of discrimination, comparing his legal jeopardy to the historic legacy of anti-Black prejudice in the U.S. legal system.

5 tips for talking to kids about their weight

It is no secret that a growing percentage of Americans can be considered overweight or obese, and that includes children. The number of kids between the ages of 2 and 19 who can be categorized as obese has now grown to 20 per cent, or one in five.

Stay Connected