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Arrest made after random attack on woman in Montreal metro

Police officers are seen in the Montreal metro on Wednesday, April 10, 2024. (CTV News) Police officers are seen in the Montreal metro on Wednesday, April 10, 2024. (CTV News)
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Montreal police have made an arrest in connection with another random physical assault on transit users in the metro system.

Police said they arrested a 35-year-old woman Friday morning and she is expected to appear in court to face a charge of assault causing bodily harm after the woman was attacked on April 4.

The victim is the daughter of La Presse columnist Nathalie Collard, who wrote on social media that her daughter was "punched in the face" while waiting for the metro at the Lionel-Groulx station and that there were "no security guards in sight."

The arrest comes amid growing concern about safety in the metro network, particularly due to random attacks by strangers.

On April 3, a group of teenagers were involved in the stabbing of a 35-year-old homeless man at the entrance of the Lionel-Groulx station.

Police arrested four teens the following day.

In response to security concerns, the Societe de transport de Montreal (STM) announced a new plan that would see special constables and other employees in teams of four monitoring 10 metro stations flagged as the most problematic.

"There is an increase in reports. There is an increase in vulnerable clients, addiction issues, mental health in our network. And we're worried about the loyalty of our clients," said STM board president Eric Alan Caldwell when the new plan was announced.

The plan took effect last Saturday and will run until the end of April, though the STM said it could be extended if necessary.

Montreal police are asking anyone who witnesses a crime to call 911 or to use the emergency telephones in metro cars and stations. Confidential reports can made by calling 514-393-1133.

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