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McGill University to seek second injunction to remove pro-Palestinian encampment

People walk past the pro-Palestinian protest encampment on McGill University campus, in Montreal, Monday, May 13, 2024. (Ryan Remiorz, The Canadian Press) People walk past the pro-Palestinian protest encampment on McGill University campus, in Montreal, Monday, May 13, 2024. (Ryan Remiorz, The Canadian Press)
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McGill University is not done seeking legal action to remove the pro-Palestinian encampment on its campus.

"The University will move forward with the next steps in the process to seek an interlocutory injunction following the decision by the Superior Court of Quebec regarding McGill’s application for a provisional injunction," the university said in a news release on Friday.

The university sought an emergency injunction on May 10 to remove the encampment due to safety concerns, which a Quebec court rejected this week.

"We maintain our belief that McGill as a private property owner does have the right to authorize usage of its grounds as well as its buildings," the university said. "McGill’s request for a provisional injunction did not seek to stop protests on its campus; it sought to stop an indefinite occupation of its property."

Two students requested a first injunction, which was rejected on May 1.

Members of the encampment have said that they will remain in place until their demands that the university divest from investments in companies linked to Israel's war in Gaza.

The university said in its statement that it has met with members of the encampment six times between May 3 and 10 in the hopes of finding a solution. 

McGill also said that its spring convocation ceremonies have been moved to the Bell Centre instead of the downtown campus, as a result of the encampment. In its May 10 injunction request filing, the university said the cost of finding a new venue for the 2024 convocation came at a cost of about $700,000.

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