Skip to main content

SOPFEU urges fire caution in the face of hot, dry weather

Archives: Small shoots are seen among burned trees near de Lebel-sur-Quevillon, Wednesday, July 5 2023.  (LA PRESSE CANADIENNE/Adrian Wyld) Archives: Small shoots are seen among burned trees near de Lebel-sur-Quevillon, Wednesday, July 5 2023. (LA PRESSE CANADIENNE/Adrian Wyld)
Share

The hot, dry weather of the last few days is prompting the Société de protection des forêts contre le feu (SOPFEU) to issue a call for caution when it comes to fire risks.

In a press release, SOPFEU notes that summer conditions increase the risk of intense fires in several regions.

As of Tuesday morning, the risk was considered "very high" in many areas of the western part of the province.

"Over the next few days, a ridge of high pressure will settle over the province, bringing warm, dry weather to much of Quebec," explained SOPFEU. "These weather conditions could lead to more fires, which could spread farther over the next few days."

SOPFEU is reminding people not to leave anything behind after an outdoor activity that could start a fire.

The organization is asking people to extinguish campfires, take extra care with flammable materials and clean hot spots on all-terrain vehicles.

Since the start of the season, SOPFEU has recorded 99 fires affecting 87.3 hectares of forest, which is slightly below average for this time of year.

According to SOPFEU, 99 per cent of this spring's fires are attributable to human activity.

-- This report by The Canadian Press was first published in French on May 21, 2024.

CTVNews.ca Top Stories

Why Mount Rainier is the U.S. volcano keeping scientists up at night

The snowcapped peak of Mount Rainier, which towers 4.3 kilometres (2.7 miles) above sea level in Washington state, has not produced a significant volcanic eruption in the past 1,000 years. Yet, more than Hawaii’s bubbling lava fields or Yellowstone’s sprawling supervolcano, it’s Mount Rainier that has many U.S. volcanologists worried.

Stay Connected